It’s a kind of magic

“I always had empathy for objects, and in my practice in recent years, I have become more specifically interested in collecting those awkward and sometimes ugly fragments, those hidden beauties, those components that were intended for life as jewellery. I try to provide them with a new opportunity, a chance to sing again or to sing at last. I have a great clamoring collection, all demanding attention, each one such a handful that I keep them tucked away, restless in their boxes, waiting for their day to shine. Is their oily smile, their rugged gesture, the rust of their metal, the giggle of the plastics, the wink of glass, the jungle of material emotions locked in these fragments, that I am looking to give room for expression”.

HELEN BRITTON

Extract from PREMIO COMINELLI catalogue 2015, p. 14.

Helen cavallino

Helen Britton, Horse brooch from the CORNUCOPIA exhibition at SIENNA PATTI Gallery, 10 August – 3 September 2012

 

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HELEN BRITTON,  Knife Garden, Silver (925), steel, vintage glass, diamonds, 2012
[© By the author via KLIMT02]  ●  SCHIAPARELLI, Embroidered gown from Haute Couture Fall/Winter collection 2016 [source: Vogue.com via Pinterest]

Read Ted Snell’s essay on Helen Britton via Klimt02

 

 

 

 

 

Annunci

Be opened to other territories

Today, artistic jewellery sits within the realm of fine arts debate; however its position within a history of traditional trade emphasize the role of its material . If there is anything that defines contemporary jewellery, it is the connection with material; a connection that resonates with its primitive roots. For centuries, jewellers have experimented with materials in order to understand the ways in which their hands can transform material into physical object that can be touched and caressed.  But the contemporary jeweler doesn’t not only work in dialogue with physical materials like stone, metal and plastic; instead, they are open to other territories, where the materials are made of doubts and desires, curiosities and fears, uncertainties, and reiterations of unexpected innovations.

Ramón Puig Cuyàs

Extract from ROBERTA BERNABEI,  “Contemporary Jewellers. Interviews with European Artits”, London, Bloomsbury, 2003, p. 174

Ramon Puig Cuyas - Oscar de l arenta 2RAMÓN PUIG CUYÀS, Brooch 1699 –  Oxidized nickel silver, enamel on steel, gold leaf and fossil stone.. 7 x 7 x 1.5 cm. From series: The Maps of the Forest series, 2017 [photo credit: Klimt02]OSCAR DE LA RENTA, Dress from Ready-to-Wear Spring/Summer 2018 collection [source: Vogue.com via Pinterest]

Ramon P-Cuyas - Oscar de la renta 1RAMÓN PUIG CUYÀS, Two brooches from the series Walled Garden, 2004-2005 [Source: Pinterest] ♦ OSCAR DE LA RENTA, Dress from Ready-to-Wear Spring/Summer 2018 collection [source : Vogue.com via Pinterest]

See you soon and stay Bark,

Nichka